Granddaughter just diagnosed with type 1 diabetes

quickcat

DIS Veteran
Joined
Apr 28, 2011
Test often, more than you normally do because of all the excitement and walking she can drop quickly. I have two type one diabetic children, one diagnosed at age one and one at age seven. We have done many cruises and been to wdw. My advice is to take extra supplies and make sure to always have carbs on hand at night for lows. You will have a great time! Sorry you have to join the type one "family" but as you have heard, it does become more and more second nature as time goes on. Take one day at a time! She will do great!
 

Tink_83

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
No, don't do this. As mentioned above, Type 1 diabetics can eat normal foods. Half the time the servers don't understand the difference between Type I and Type 2 and would just push sugar free items that actually have more fat and sodium in them. No need! Don't bother telling the servers.
My mom and multiple siblings are type I diabetics and have found it useful to indicate they are a diabetic to get certain starchy foods swapped out for other options (like a salad, etc.). Yes you can eat normal food but if you can get a healthier option why not. They don't indicate it on the dining reservations they normally just tell the server and ask for certain substitutions if they feel that will help them.
 
  • disneyfaninaz

    It takes faith, trust & pixie dust!
    Joined
    Apr 19, 2007
    My mom and multiple siblings are type I diabetics and have found it useful to indicate they are a diabetic to get certain starchy foods swapped out for other options (like a salad, etc.). Yes you can eat normal food but if you can get a healthier option why not. They don't indicate it on the dining reservations they normally just tell the server and ask for certain substitutions if they feel that will help them.
    Yes, you can certainly swap out any food that you want. Still you don't have to tell them that it's because of diabetes. If they hear diabetes they will feel compelled to offer "sugar free" items, because they don't know the difference.
     

    Stepharella

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Dec 8, 2013
    My DD14 has T1 diabetes and was diagnosed at age 9. Have snacks and low treatments with you for lineup lows so you won't have to leave a long line. FRIO bags are invaluable for keeping insulin at a cool temperature in Florida's heat. Always keep her glucometer with you.....almost all of Disney's rides allow you to bring bags onto the ride. The first aid stations in each park will take any extra insulin you pack and keep it refridgerated for you. We always keep a DKA kit at the first aid station but my DD is using a pump. Be aware that in the extreme heat of Florida, being overheated can mask a low since they have a similar presentation.....when in doubt, check her sugars.

    Regarding the food at Disney, the restaurants do not provide carbohydrate information which I find extremely frustrating in trying to regulate her blood sugars....less so now that she is on the pump but, prior to this, trying to measure carbs for a strict diet was challenging. When we first travelled after diagnosis, we spoke to the chefs several times but found them to be very limited in being helpful......that being said they can let you know if there are any added sugar to the recipes they use. My best advice regarding nutrition is to bring a pocket sized book such as Calorie King. You should be able to use this as a rough guide to guessing how many carbs are in a serving size.

    Good luck and have fun! She will be fine.
    My son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in September and thank you for the helpful information! This puts me at ease a little. This is the first time to WDW since he was diagnosed!
     

    DisneyOma

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 27, 2015
    Yes, you can certainly swap out any food that you want. Still you don't have to tell them that it's because of diabetes. If they hear diabetes they will feel compelled to offer "sugar free" items, because they don't know the difference.
    Which restaurants have let you swap out any food that you want? I can see them not including something you don't want, but do they really let you pick anything else you want to substitute? Is this at all restaurants or only at table service? I'm asking because that hasn't been our experience at all for quick service. No substituting at all - and rarely have we been able to get stuff removed as so much of the food is pre-prepared.
     

    Selket

    Been there - done that
    Joined
    Feb 28, 2000
    Which restaurants have let you swap out any food that you want? I can see them not including something you don't want, but do they really let you pick anything else you want to substitute? Is this at all restaurants or only at table service? I'm asking because that hasn't been our experience at all for quick service. No substituting at all - and rarely have we been able to get stuff removed as so much of the food is pre-prepared.
    My younger son has type 1 and severe food allergies but we've never run into an issue when we asked to swap something - TS or QS. Of course the items need to be somewhat similar in price or type - like they let him get a bag of chips if the fries weren't safe - that sort of thing. He doesn't tend to swap out for a less carb item though as he's a teenage boy so he eats like a typical teen boy on vacation - lol! His swapping is done for the food allergies typically. At a QS place we do tell them he has food allergies so that now results in getting someone to consult with us. Perhaps that is the how you have to do it - by talking to someone else besides the cashier taking the order? So if that's the case, you'd have to tell the cashier when you step up to order that someone in your party has a dietary restriction and would like to have the X instead of the Y. TS we just tell the server and never have an issue.
     
  • Terpsichore

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jul 26, 2010
    We are heading back to WDW in July. My son has Type 1 and this is his first visit while using an insulin pump. We have FRIO pouches for transporting insulin, but I was wondering whether we should invest in a pump wallet. I'm concerned that the insulin in his pump will be affected by the heat. Has anyone used one of these when visiting in warmer months?
     

    anorman

    Greetings from The Great White North
    Joined
    May 31, 2009
    We are heading back to WDW in July. My son has Type 1 and this is his first visit while using an insulin pump. We have FRIO pouches for transporting insulin, but I was wondering whether we should invest in a pump wallet. I'm concerned that the insulin in his pump will be affected by the heat. Has anyone used one of these when visiting in warmer months?
    You can always take advantage of Disney's DAS so that he can wait out the lines in an air conditioned environment. We have done this on our past two trips and it works very well and I don't have to worry about the insulin becoming ineffective due to prolonged exposure to Florida's summer temps. In doing so we had no trouble with my DDs blood sugars/spoiled insulin.
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    We are heading back to WDW in July. My son has Type 1 and this is his first visit while using an insulin pump. We have FRIO pouches for transporting insulin, but I was wondering whether we should invest in a pump wallet. I'm concerned that the insulin in his pump will be affected by the heat. Has anyone used one of these when visiting in warmer months?
    I have been at Disney fore a week in the middle of summer ( and I live where it is hotter then Disney) and I have had no problems with my insulin getting to hot. a few things you can do if you want to ( I never do) is only fill enough insulin for one day and change out the insulin in the pump every day or ever 2 days, ( I have gone as long as 7days but nor recommended ) keep the pump in your pocket and tuck the tubbing inside your pocket,

    As fair as getting a DAS I use one for different region then T1D, and I find I wait more in the sun, heat then If I did not ( according to my friend that does not use a DAS and sometimes goes with out me). depending on who you get a GR they may not think not being in the sun is an ok use for the DAS card since most ( a good number) of rides are indoor with AC or under cover, and I know for my self I find that I have to wait out side in the sun to get in to the ride to use my return time more often then if I could just go in stand by ( I am thinking of space as just one example)

    on a side note, I have ruined a few insulin at Disney by putting them in the fridge and them freezing, on my last trip I notice that the fridge were different that you can not longer turn them up or down, but I still would not put insulin in a small hotel room fridge. insulin will be fine left out in a hotel room for your stay.
     
  • gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    another note I know when the DAS first came out they were not giving them to really any one with T1D ( I was there for FFL and they were saying that they no longer were getting anything) but Disney was give out wheel chair tag for stroller depending on how big your child is this maybe better option as they will have shade more of the time a place to site if they go low, just something else to think about.
     

    anorman

    Greetings from The Great White North
    Joined
    May 31, 2009
    another note I know when the DAS first came out they were not giving them to really any one with T1D ( I was there for FFL and they were saying that they no longer were getting anything) but Disney was give out wheel chair tag for stroller depending on how big your child is this maybe better option as they will have shade more of the time a place to site if they go low, just something else to think about.
    When we travelled WDW in the summer of 2015, we were able to get a DAS for my DD who was then 12. The CM was very polite and respectful of our request. There were no issues.
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    When we travelled WDW in the summer of 2015, we were able to get a DAS for my DD who was then 12. The CM was very polite and respectful of our request. There were no issues.
    I did not mean every one I just heard form a few people when ai was at FFL, I think anyone that thinks, needs acomidation while at Disney should go to GR and talk to the people in GR and let them know what kinds of problems they have, what they struggle with, things like that and come up with a plane to enjoy Disney to the best of there ability. I do not think anyone really should go in and say I need a DAS card and here is why. And the region why is we know our Disability best and the CM at Disney know Disney best and just saying what at Disney is hard with out Disability and coming up with the best tool for us is the way to go IMHO.
     

    EveDallas

    Always keep fighting
    Joined
    Aug 21, 2008
    I would never leave insulin out. I've never had a problem (been dealing with Type 1 for 18 years), but if I was worried I would keep it in the ice bucket before I'd leave it out.
     

    DisneyOma

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 27, 2015
    We are heading back to WDW in July. My son has Type 1 and this is his first visit while using an insulin pump. We have FRIO pouches for transporting insulin, but I was wondering whether we should invest in a pump wallet. I'm concerned that the insulin in his pump will be affected by the heat. Has anyone used one of these when visiting in warmer months?
    You can always take advantage of Disney's DAS so that he can wait out the lines in an air conditioned environment. We have done this on our past two trips and it works very well and I don't have to worry about the insulin becoming ineffective due to prolonged exposure to Florida's summer temps. In doing so we had no trouble with my DDs blood sugars/spoiled insulin.
    How hot is too hot? Body temperature is pretty hot to begin with - so why would a hot day (in the 90s) make a difference for the insulin in the pump?
     

    gap2368

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 27, 2015
    How hot is too hot? Body temperature is pretty hot to begin with - so why would a hot day (in the 90s) make a difference for the insulin in the pump?
    Insulin in a pump for 3 days can be very different then insulin in your body and working to lower glucose levels, I will say I do not think that having a pump alone should be enough to get a DAS, but that is up to the Person with the pump, and GR to decide
     

    mitzy150

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jun 7, 2017
    I'm not sure what the server would do, except if it is helpful to speed up service if a low is impending.
    Type 1's can eat anything but rat poison, and cookies made with rat poison (direct quote from our endo).
    As long as you have some good carb counting apps and/or the calorie king book, she can have anything. Things like pizza and pasta can be tricky - very delayed increase in blood sugar, so don't give much insulin before the meal if any. We bolus after pizza and pasta - it lines up with the sugar spike better. Fried foods also delays blood sugar response. You would bolus differently for say a grilled cheese sandwich on white bread (before the meal) vs. chicken fingers and fries (after the meal). A little travel scale is a good idea too - especially when you're first starting out and you have no idea what 1c. of pasta or 100 grams of apples looks like.
    These tricks of managing type 1 diabetes come with time. As we say, if you let her run higher - no harm done (not too high though). She will be honeymooning, so she likely has some insulin of her own still working for the time being. That will help with this trip.
    Can't Agree with you more! The one thing I would recommend, is that if you do have a low, and you don't have a snack on you is to find a cast member and tell them you are a type one who is having a low, and need a juice or pop quickly and cant wait in line. This is especially helpful if you wind up without things and are low around lunch time when all the food places have enormous lineups. There is always a cast member at the quick service restaurants who is in front of the lines and greeting people (I have celiac as well, so this is also the person to talk to to get special menus). They will (at least they have the two times I have done it), without delay run back and bring you a juice or pop. Every time I have had my wallet out to pay, and they have never made me, which is so incredibly kind. I have been to Disney World 9 times, and Land 14, and on a Cruise once, and have never come up against any obstacles as a Type One (I am 27 now, and was diagnosed at 3). Also, if you find your daughter goes low, and misses out on something, or has to get out of a line, make sure you tell a cast member. I have never had to leave a line personally, but I had a friend who did once, and they gave her a special pass to come and get back to the front essentially after she treated her low. Probably the best story I have as a Type One is when we went when I was 11, and I had a very bad low right before the beginning of a parade. My mom took me to a bench quickly as we were standing and got some sugar in me, and when we were gone we lost our spot for the parade (a cast member said they would save it for us, but evidently did not). Being low I got so upset and cried, and another cast member spotted us, took us to guest services, and arranged for me to have VIP seating at a parade the next day. They really go above and beyond at Disney to accommodate you, and you never run into any issues or questioning when you express a need.
     

    Melisande

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Aug 22, 2010
    I agree about keeping a kit on hand with juice because unless she is a super active child normally she will bottom out from all the walking. I am type 2 and while the two types are different, the one thing remains true for both types, we always bottom out at theme parks if we control too tightly. I leave myself around 200 an hour after eating to ensure I have room to budge from the walking. Box juices and crackers with cheese or peanut are a must have in her bag for those moments. Nothing like waiting in line for something when your loved one is about to pass out. My poor husband has had to do that maas dash before. He has been known to wave bags of candy at cashiers and throw money at them while mouthing diabetic in shock.
     

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