Luggie brand ecv experience?

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by RumpleMom, Jan 6, 2018.

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  1. RumpleMom

    RumpleMom DIS Veteran

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    Does anyone have experience with the Luggie brand ecv?

    TIA
     
  2. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    I had never heard of that brand before, so I looked it up and found it on Amazon. It seems very expensive for what it is and received 23% one star ratings (the worst) on Amazon.
    https://www.amazon.com/Luggie-Compa...e=all_reviews&pageNumber=1#reviews-filter-bar

    Whatever device you get, you want to make sure you can get it repaired easily in your area. Even the 5 star devices break down at times, so having an easy place to get fixed is very important.
     
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  4. cobright

    cobright DIS Veteran

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    It's built in Taiwan and does not seem to have an extensive dealer network. A lot of reviews claim it is under powered. I've never played with one so I can't say definitively, but I've played with a lot of mobility electrics and would like to think I can spot quality ... this one doesn't seem to fall into that category.
     
  5. jfh

    jfh Earning My Ears

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    I'm going to disagree with the above comments.

    I replaced a popular brand of portable scooter (that required disassembly for transport) with a Luggie a number of years ago. Yes, it's quite a bit more expensive than a lot of other options, but it has been worth every penny.

    It's one piece so no assembly/disassembly. You can partially collapse it flat (to put in the back of a car or front seat with ease) or fold it down to the footprint of a small carry on suitcase. My daughter calls it the Transformer.

    Li-ion battery (on all but the least expensive model), so it only takes a couple hours to charge. Great range. Absolutely the best scooter for air travel - just drive down the jet way and the baggage guys take it below and have it waiting for you when you get off the plane. Tiller is totally adjustable - this allows you to drive right up to (and essentially under) most tables / seating areas if needed and there are low and high settings for the seat. Both armrests are easily removable (I rarely use both and sometimes none). I can also "park" it in far less space than a typical ECV. When folded flat and stood up, it has the footprint of a typical folding chair and can easily be leaned up against a wall or rested in a very small space. Using an ECV on a cruise ship? Nothing beats a Luggie. No issue with those narrow hallways!

    There are a couple potential downsides. Like many portable scooters, it's not a great choice for uneven terrain (greater risk of tipping). And it weighs 53-54 pounds. Since you can lever it into a car, the effective weight is significantly less. You can also roll it like a carry on bag (it has wheels specifically for this), though I dont understand the appeal of that feature - I'm going to ride it, not pull it. ;)

    Everywhere I go people ask about it and are just amazed at the engineering and how it folds down or into a suitcase footprint. I don't understand the "it's underpowered" comments. At full speed no one can keep up with me unless they are running. I haven't had any issues with stability or build quality.

    I agree about the dealer network - few dealers have them so you are most likely buying it though one of the big mobility web sites. I haven't needed service, but it's handled though an 800 number where techs come to your home.

    I am going to WDW later this year. I'm bringing the Luggie for travel, use at the resort and as a backup. I plan on renting a larger ECV with a suspension and more comfortable seat for spending hours at the parks, but I don't really have to.
     
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  6. mamabunny

    mamabunny DIS Veteran

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    It's good to hear a real-world review from an actual user; so often on places like Amazon it's hard to know if all the reviews are genuine now (even the negative ones can be competitors trying to drive down sales, and drive customers over to their own product).

    Just curious - is the battery removable for charging on the Luggie? And have you had to replace your battery yet? It sounds like even though you have had it for a while, it's been (aside from charging the battery) maintenance free, which is always a good thing! :)
     
  7. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    Because of the Li-ion battery, be sure to check with your airline and TSA.
    There have been a lot of recent news stories about Li-ion batteries not being allowed in checked baggage. This is nothing new, but has received recent news coverage because of new luggage with built in batteries.
    Bags with non-removable batteries are not allowed to be checked.
    This is an FAA article about Li-ion batteries in wheelchairs and mobility devices:
    https://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/hazmat_safety/more_info/?hazmat=40

    TSA information:
    https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security...g/items/lithium-batteries-more-100-watt-hours
     
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  8. jfh

    jfh Earning My Ears

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    Yes, the battery is removable and can be charged off board, but it requires a home charger (about $100) accessory. I bought one, but rarely use it and typically charge the scooter while it's in the car either parked in the garage (extension cord out a car window) or while driving (cigarette lighter to AC converter). Biggest advantage to the home charger is that you can charge a spare battery at the same time you are using the scooter to charge one.

    This scooter/battery is about 3 years old. Battery range is down to 8-10 miles on a charge (best I'd ever gotten was about 14) so I'll have to consider a new one at some point. I was considering a new battery for the Disney trip but given that I'm not going to use the Luggie as my primary scooter on park days and that I can get a pretty significant recharge during a meal if needed, I'm going to wait and see how much more I can get out of this battery first.

    That is the other downside I forgot to mention - replacement batteries are expensive and rarely discounted. They are extremely small compared to regular scooter batteries and have a proprietary case. When one of my batteries finally can't hold a charge I'm going to open it up and see what's actually inside. I suspect the actual battery is a standard part that could be replaced at far less cost than through Luggie. (Retail on the high capacity version is $799. If you assume useful life is 4 years, that's still about 4x the cost of batteries for other common portable scooters)

    As for TSA or the airlines - never had an issue regarding the battery and never been asked to remove it. My last flight was January this year and I have one in a couple weeks. I used to carry a copy of the FAA requirements for Li-ion batteries but never needed it, but it's good to have the URL handy.
     
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  9. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    I wonder if they assumed it was a different type of battery since the first link I posted says this:
    Lithium ion batteries must be removed from this type of mobility device and battery terminals protected from short circuit. The lithium ion batteries must be carried in carry-on baggage only. The passenger must advise the airline of the battery location. The airline must notify the Pilot-in-command of the battery location in the cabin.

    There have also been a lot of articles about ‘smart bags’ with lithium batteries. I know one of the smart bag companies is issuing removable battery kits to retrofit their bags and another company apparently went out of business.
    This is one recent article : http://blog.ravpower.com/2017/12/travelling-smart-luggage-batteries-rule-changes/

    So, even if you traveled without removing the battery before, I would suggest checking with your airline before traveling. Better to know ahead of time if you need to do anything.
     
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  10. jfh

    jfh Earning My Ears

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    Good advice. I always mention it at gate check in since they let me down the jetway early to board. I always specify the battery is li-Ion.

    Even if you are asked to take the battery out of a Luggie, it's far easier than most scooters (one push on a tab and it pops out). It's small and weighs about 5 pounds and should easily fit in your carry on.

    I also don't think the comparison with the batteries used in the smart bags is fair. Those generate far more heat and I suspect are a totally different class of battery.
     
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  11. mamabunny

    mamabunny DIS Veteran

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    My Travelscoot is the same way; it has a removable battery that is totally proprietary, and stupidly expensive to replace. My hubs says that typically they are "banks" of rechargeable cells inside of batteries like these (I'll bet our @cobright has opened a few batteries in his day! LOL) and they are typically connected internally to each other or a charge controller of some type.

    Since my batteries are removable, I take them on board in a carry case that is supplied by the manufacturer (Travelscoot) just for the batteries, and it flies as "medical equipment" because it is part of the scooter. The airline is supposed to notify the Captain of the plane where it is located on board; typically the FA's (Flight Attendants) have us stow it in the very first overhead bins on the left. That may be a function of the particular airline we fly, however. Since the battery on my scooter is also a "structural" component (it helps hold the trailing arms off of the front wheel locked in place) my hubby created a "spacer" which is a 3D printed block the exact size and shape of the battery that is placed where the battery would go for flight.

    Yep. Me too. To all of that.
     
  12. Mickey'sZebra<3

    Mickey'sZebra<3 Jodie and Nimbus

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    I have a travel scoot too, it is brilliant but i haven't flown with it yet. Last time i took an electric wheelchair and they let me use it up until we boarded then they put it under the plane with the suitcases, hopefully the travel scoot will be much easier because of how light it is and how easy it is to fold and pick up etc
     
  13. cmwade77

    cmwade77 DIS Veteran

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    While yes, you should check with your airline about the proper procedures for your type of battery, some have to be in the cabin and some have to be below the cabin, the reality is you can fill with lithium ion battery powered ECVs, or any ECVs for that matter, ADA ensures that accommodations must be provided and since the batteries will be nonspillable, this won't be an issue.

    You can see the FAA rules here: https://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/hazmat_safety/?cid=FB210

    Basically, if the battery is installed, you will have to gate check it. If the battery is removed, it has to be in the cabin and this applies to lithium ion batteries, other types of batteries may be different. And this is current as of when I am typing this.
     
  14. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    These screenshots are the detail information from the page you linked, which is basically the same information in the link I posted, just a different format.
    So, what it boils down to for lithium-ion batteries in a mobility device is whether or not the batteries are in a protective casing/housing when they are installed. If it’s a collapsible ECV and not in a protective casing, they need to be removed. The owner’s manual should have information about the battery and casing that the owner can refer to in deciding which FAA rules apply.

    EAF99F79-F049-45FD-AFFB-BB55F4629BC6.jpeg 8AA442DB-8968-4C86-B8A6-31F42BB6BFC6.jpeg
     
  15. jfh

    jfh Earning My Ears

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    All of this is nice, but not applicable to the Luggie, which is what this thread is about.

    The Luggie Li-Ion battery is approved for transport by the FAA and does not need to be removed from the scooter. Obviously it can be carried on board if you prefer, but multiple airlines and pilots have told me the same thing - the battery is not an issue and does not require special handling. I've had the Luggie stowed in the cabin and I've had it stowed in the hold with luggage without issue/incident.

    If you buy a new Luggie, the included battery is approved.

    Luggie has recently released a super high capacity battery which is NOT approved, but it is only available aftermarket and is plastered with warnings.
     
  16. SueM in MN

    SueM in MN combining the teacups with a roller coaster Moderator

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    The original question was about Luggie scooters, but the answers did include other brands, so the travel information is pertinent.
    I am closing the thread though since it has run its course.
    The variety of different types of devices means a lot more choices and maybe not needing any special vehicle to ytransport it - which is a very good thing.
     

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