Question .. please don’t bash here

Discussion in 'disABILITIES!' started by coastermom, Dec 18, 2017.

  1. coastermom

    coastermom <font color=red>Proud Redhead<br><font color=peach

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    Hello all ..
    Been in pain for a few weeks and after XRays and an MRI I have been informed that I have a back issue that requires me not to stand for long periods of time. As we have a up coming trip to WDW in February the dr mentioned a note for a DAS pass. Not really sure what the requirements are for DAS pass does anyone know ? Please don’t be mean I am trying to
    Process lots of information on my new medical condition and it’s just a question.

    Thanks
     
  2. ShirikiUtundu

    ShirikiUtundu Cursed Idol

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    With doctor's blessings you should integrate some core strengthening work into your lifestyle; it will help the standing back pain issue.
    Do you have any problems with walking at all, or just standing? A lot of people have issues with standing in one place too long, usually due to the lack of core strength.
    I would start there and see how you are doing over the next month. You have lots of time to figure out what it is you will need, if anything by then. When you have a better idea of what you can and can't deal with, if you still need the pass, it will be up to you to tell the CM what you need. There is no pre-work/requirements to get the pass.
     
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  4. coastermom

    coastermom <font color=red>Proud Redhead<br><font color=peach

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    Hopeful to start PT soon but Dr mentioned it to me as we often go to an amusement park by our home that recently started a Christmas time event . Lines for basic things like the cable cars are up to 45 minutes which is too long for me to stand . Hopefully with some work it will get better !! Our local park requires a Dr note with very little information. Was wondering if Disney also requires one .. guess not .. Thanks
     
  5. bumbershoot

    bumbershoot DIS Veteran

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    From what I’ve learned, when you have a problem standing, Disney will expect that you get a scooter or wheelchair, and that is the accommodation. A DAS isn’t given for that situation since wheelchair/scooter is the solution.
     
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  6. LilyWDW

    LilyWDW Going to My Happy Place

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    A DAS is not normally used for mobility or stamina issues. Issues with being able to stand would fall under that categorization. They will suggest a wheelchair, ECV, or other mobility aid.

    Disney also will not use a note form your doctor. You would need to explain why you need to wait for an attraction outside of the line that would not fall under mobility or stamina.
     
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  7. gap2368

    gap2368 DIS Veteran

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    I am sorry you are in pain that is not fun at all.

    No one here can tell you will or will not get a DAS pass we can tell you what we think or what works for us.

    in order to get a DAS pass, you will need to go to guest relations and talk to them, they will ask what your concerns are that has to do with waiting in line? it sounds like your concerns are standing for a long time. If this is your only need a DAS will not help you as a set when waiting is not guaranteed.

    I would rent a wheelchair as you can use this a walker and sit when you need to this way you have a set when need be and you can also walk some too.

    if you think you need to sit more then you can use an ECV

    Disney will not look at Dr notes
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2017
  8. LadyD

    LadyD DIS Veteran

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    Back injuries are awful. I'm sorry you're in pain. I hope you feel quite a bit better before your trip.

    Something to keep in mind with a DAS pass too is that even with a DAS, you could be waiting upwards of 15-20 minutes in a line when you return to the attraction after your allotted wait time depending on how busy the park/attraction is at that particular time. You don't get to avoid all line waiting and go straight to the front after waiting for your return time. Not sure how long you can stand without exacerbating your pain and condition, but it is something to consider when you're planning your strategies for the parks.

    Good luck with your treatment and I hope you have a wonderful, pain-free, stress free trip to WDW :)
     
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  9. Bete

    Bete DIS Veteran

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    I would be highly concerned not to injure yourself more by going on rides that could hurt your back more. Look over the rides very carefully. Even getting in and out of rides may cause a strain. You may want to concentrate on more shows, fireworks, parades, and the street entertainment.

    I agree with the others that using a wheelchair or scooter is your best option. I vote scooter for a few reasons. You will be more independent everywhere you go. Also, it will be quicker than someone pushing a wheelchair and the pusher won't be exhausted. You will accomplish more in the parks using a scooter. You will last longer in the parks, too.

    You have a little time to make your final choice. There's nothing stopping you from trying for a DAS, but you need to be prepared if you don't get one. A doctor's note is not necessary, but then again it might help. Make sure the doctor's note is on a prescription type paper to be more official looking.
     
  10. bumbershoot

    bumbershoot DIS Veteran

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    They aren’t supposed to look at it. So it won’t help.
     
  11. srwarden1928

    srwarden1928 DIS Veteran

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    It all depends on the CM at guest services. I have heard people on the boards tell about not being able to get DAS. My niece could barely get out one sentence to say she needed an assistance card for her son and the CM was processing it.
     
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  12. k8Davies

    k8Davies K8Davies

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    I have found the CM helpful and very understanding, but it's always good to have a plan B - i.e. a mobility device as at the end of the day you want the best holiday you can have.

    Also I hope you're back problems easy very soon and you have a fantastic trip full of fun and good times.
     
  13. DisneyOma

    DisneyOma DIS Veteran

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    No note required for a DAS. Actually, the doctor is being a little obnoxious, IMO, for offering one - like he has the power to tell Disney what to do, KWIM? ADA states no note needed to prove a disability, except in some specific examples. The DAS is not one.

    If your local park is requiring one, they are breaking the law, if in the USA.

    Have you thought about all the walking you'd be doing at WDW? Does walking count for part of the standing issues? there's so much more walking/standing done outside of the queues than in at WDW. waiting to get in the parks, walking from bus/parking lot, waiting for food, bus,bathroom, etc. While a DAS might help you for the queues, consider what will help you for the entire trip - would a mobility device make more sense?
     
  14. lanejudy

    lanejudy Moderator Moderator

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    The local park may give "front of the line" access or similar - something above and beyond basic equal access. In that case, they are allowed to require proof. Sort of like license plates/hang-tags for parking can require proof.

    @coastermom here is a link to information about the Disability Access Service (DAS) at WDW: https://www.disboards.com/threads/w...15-digital-das-on-tickets-magicbands.3178976/

    PPs are correct that 1) a note from your doctor is likely to be ignored or refused and 2) you should consider using a mobility device, as it's highly possible that WDW won't issue a DAS for mobility/stamina needs. If you prefer to walk, a wheelchair or rollator may be a good option because you can push while walking and sit when needed. And ECV is another option, and again you don't have to sit at all times if you choose to park it somewhere. Depending on crowd levels, even through the FP+ queue you could be in line for 15-20 minutes at a slow walk/stop/walk/stop pace. Some attractions have pre-shows requiring standing. You may bring a mobility device through the queues which would give you a place to sit if/when the standing is too long.

    Enjoy your vacation!
     
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  15. OurBigTrip

    OurBigTrip DIS Veteran

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    Someone had better sue Six Flags then.

    https://www.sixflags.com/magicmountain/plan-your-visit/guests-with-disabilities
     
  16. Hoodie

    Hoodie <font color=purple>Going to BC and GF with one wee

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    As someone who has back issues, I can say a DAS may not be the most helpful thing. It does not shorten wait times, only allows you to wait outside the line and there are very few places to wait anywhere where you can also sit. In fact, we have often waited longer total with the DAS as the return time is the wait time minus 10 minutes and the FP return is often 15-20 minutes. First, you need to figure out what is the best way to handle the issue in every day life. For me, walking is the best. Sitting too long can aggravate it, as can standing for too long. Standing on a bus is completely out of the question - the adjustments you make while standing on a moving vehicle pretty much render me immobile. If sitting is no issue, an ECV may be your best bet. If sitting and standing are both issues, a wheelchair or Rollator may help. That way you can push it when you need to walk, sit when you need to sit. There are probably rides you will need to avoid as well.

    Non-DAS adjustments you can plan for:

    -If a Disney bus is full, just stand to the side and wait for the next. You'll be first on and can sit. Remember - a DAS doesn't help with the buses.
    -A good touring plan and FP+. We have found this is usually more helpful than the DAS.
    -Determine if you think an ECV or wheelchair would help. Remember, it's only a tool. It doesn't define you. Try one out at your local grocery store and see if it helps.
    -Schedule mid-day sitdown lunches.
    -Realize there are some rides you will not be able to do (Dinosaur is awful) and some you may be able to do with adjustments (Safari can be VERY bumpy, but the bumps are usually minimized if you are in the front).

    I know you are probably overwhelmed right now, but take the next month or so to figure out what works best FOR YOU. You can't do anything about a DAS until you get to Disney and no one can say whether you will get it or not. You can still have a great trip without one if you figure out your needs in advance.
     
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  17. TeresaWen

    TeresaWen DIS Veteran

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    My husband and I spend two weeks in Disney in October. He was just recovering from back surgery. Walking and standing were indeed a struggle. We did not attempt to request a das card since I heard Disney's answer to all mobility issues is a wheelchair or scooter. It took a few days but when we finally rented the wheelchair we ended up having the best vacation ever.

    Plus for me - I ate whatever I wanted at all the food and wine booths. Pushing the chair burned so many calories I actually lost weight :)

    Disney is just so very accessible and I found cast members to be kind and extremely helpful. Guests too.

    Hope you have as good a trip a we did. Good luck!!
     
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  18. anonymousegirl

    anonymousegirl DIS Veteran

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    I have heard that many people get a wheelchair and they push it while walking and then use it to sit in the longer lines. This way you will have a seat no matter where you are (bus queue, ride or show queue, or waiting for a parade). Now, with back issues, you won't be riding the big "Thrill" rides, but the queue for Peter pan rivals Space Mountain most days!
     
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  19. gap2368

    gap2368 DIS Veteran

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    This is what I was saying about using a wheelchair like a walker. I know a few people with back problems sitting too long is not good and also walking standing too long is not good, OP if you are able to walk a good amount ( even slowly) I would look into a wheelchair and not an ECV if sitting is hard for a long time is hard for you. This way you have your set when and where need be.
    another thing about a wheelchair is you can put your bag or whatever you bring ( if anything) in the set when not sitting and on the back when sitting, Also you can use the handicap parade viewing areas.
     
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  20. kaytieeldr

    kaytieeldr Post hoc, ergo propter hoc

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    According to the rest of the information on that page, Six Flags' Assistance Pass appears to provide above and beyond access.
     
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  21. DisneyOma

    DisneyOma DIS Veteran

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    But providing that is also illegal - ADA states that there can't be a service given that is above what the average person gets. Anyone can get a fake doctor's letter, and lots of doctors get off at writing that special permission, feeding into the God complex issues some doctors have. I'll look up the clause that states the above is not supposed to happen. I have it bookmarked on an older computer.

    Found it:

    • (b) Participation in unequal benefit. A public accommodation shall not afford an individual or class of individuals, on the basis of a disability or disabilities of such individual or class, directly, or through contractual, licensing, or other arrangements, with the opportunity to participate in or benefit from a good, service, facility, privilege, advantage, or accommodation that is not equal to that afforded to other individuals.
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017

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