TD USD visa card

tinkerone

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jun 3, 2007
BMO has a US MC that might be of interest to you. The fee is waived if you spend a minimum of $1000 on it after the first year. We have this card and find we have never had a year that we didn't meet the target amount, its not hard to do.




BMO® U.S. Dollar Mastercard®*
  • The Best BMO® Credit Card for Spending in U.S. dollars.
  • Low $35 USD annual fee
  • Fee Rebate offer: Spend just $1,000 USD in one year on your card, and the annual fee for the following year is on us
  • Free extended warranty and purchase protection
  • Zero Dollar Liability: protects you from unauthorized use of your credit card
  • 24-hour, out-of-country emergency assistance with GlobalAssistTM*
  • Acceptance at over 30 million locations in the U.S., Canada and worldwide
  • Cash advances at over 1 million ATMs worldwide5
 

efrant

Mouseketeer
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
BMO has a US MC that might be of interest to you. The fee is waived if you spend a minimum of $1000 on it after the first year. We have this card and find we have never had a year that we didn't meet the target amount, its not hard to do.




BMO® U.S. Dollar Mastercard®*
  • The Best BMO® Credit Card for Spending in U.S. dollars.
  • Low $35 USD annual fee
  • Fee Rebate offer: Spend just $1,000 USD in one year on your card, and the annual fee for the following year is on us
  • Free extended warranty and purchase protection
  • Zero Dollar Liability: protects you from unauthorized use of your credit card
  • 24-hour, out-of-country emergency assistance with GlobalAssistTM*
  • Acceptance at over 30 million locations in the U.S., Canada and worldwide
  • Cash advances at over 1 million ATMs worldwide5
That card offers no rewards for your spending though. I'd personally rather put my spending on a card that's going to give me cashback or points rather than nothing.
 

StarSeven7

DIS Veteran
Joined
Nov 13, 2017
I’m American but have lived in Canada for the past 14 years. Have you not needed a social security number to get a US credit card? I don’t ever remember getting one without giving them my social security number. Honestly, for what you want I see no benefit in getting a US credit card. It seems like a lot of hassle and moving money around. I still have my US bank account (still paying off my student loans) and my parents are still living there but for us the most simple and best solution has been to get Canadian credit cards with no foreign exchange fees. We have the Hometrust Visa and the Rogers world elite MasterCard, both of which have no annual fee. We put all of our spending on credit cards, we’re in the US all the time and I buy stuff from US websites all the time. Then you’re getting the best exchange rate you can get at the time of spending.
 
  • efrant

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jan 4, 2017
    I’m American but have lived in Canada for the past 14 years. Have you not needed a social security number to get a US credit card? I don’t ever remember getting one without giving them my social security number. Honestly, for what you want I see no benefit in getting a US credit card. It seems like a lot of hassle and moving money around. I still have my US bank account (still paying off my student loans) and my parents are still living there but for us the most simple and best solution has been to get Canadian credit cards with no foreign exchange fees. We have the Hometrust Visa and the Rogers world elite MasterCard, both of which have no annual fee. We put all of our spending on credit cards, we’re in the US all the time and I buy stuff from US websites all the time. Then you’re getting the best exchange rate you can get at the time of spending.
    Some U.S. credit card issuers require a SSN, while others, like Amex, Citi, and TD Bank do not. They are happy to issue you a card with a foreign passport as identification.

    In terms of moving money around, it is extremely simple, particularly if you bank with TD or RBC. You can move funds North to South or South to North fee-free, and it is seamless with RBC, and almost seamless with TD.

    I agree, the simple method is to use a no- f/x fee credit card. A couple of things related to the cards you mentioned thought: The Rogers WE MC does not refund you the 2.5% in case you need to return something or cancel your booking. So if you book at US$5k refundable hotel stay, and you decide to cancel, you'd be out ~$165 if you had used your Rogers card. As for the Home Trust card, from what I hear, they are discontinuing rewards on non-CAD purchases. So while you don't get dinged the 2.5% f/x fee, you get no rewards for your spend. The Brim cards, Scotia Passport Infinite and HSBC WE MC are still good choices IMO. That said, you are limited in some cases: some companies will not accept a Canadian credit card (regardless if it's a USD card or a CAD card), and the rewards you get are greater if you use an American card. I concede that most of this means nothing if you don't spend a significant amount of money in USD. But if you do spend a lot in USD, you can save/earn hundreds/thousands of dollars.

    In terms of getting the best exchange rate, that depends on how much it costs each person to purchase USD. The Rogers WE card charges you the MC rate, which is usually around 0.4%-0.6% above spot. For someone who purchases USD at less than that, then the Rogers card (or any Canadian card for that matter) would not get them the best exchange rate.
     

    qbacreative

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Sep 2, 2019
    Thanks a lot efrant, so now I'm ready to go to one of the TD Orlando's branch next week, and open the account and the credit card.

    Btw last question, what are the benefits of the Disney Chase card?

    We are planning to go back to Disney again in after this trip 2021 or 2022, so by then I should have over a year of the U.S credit to open a Chase card.
     

    qbacreative

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Sep 2, 2019
    Some U.S. credit card issuers require a SSN, while others, like Amex, Citi, and TD Bank do not. They are happy to issue you a card with a foreign passport as identification.

    In terms of moving money around, it is extremely simple, particularly if you bank with TD or RBC. You can move funds North to South or South to North fee-free, and it is seamless with RBC, and almost seamless with TD.

    I agree, the simple method is to use a no- f/x fee credit card. A couple of things related to the cards you mentioned thought: The Rogers WE MC does not refund you the 2.5% in case you need to return something or cancel your booking. So if you book at US$5k refundable hotel stay, and you decide to cancel, you'd be out ~$165 if you had used your Rogers card. As for the Home Trust card, from what I hear, they are discontinuing rewards on non-CAD purchases. So while you don't get dinged the 2.5% f/x fee, you get no rewards for your spend. The Brim cards, Scotia Passport Infinite and HSBC WE MC are still good choices IMO. That said, you are limited in some cases: some companies will not accept a Canadian credit card (regardless if it's a USD card or a CAD card), and the rewards you get are greater if you use an American card. I concede that most of this means nothing if you don't spend a significant amount of money in USD. But if you do spend a lot in USD, you can save/earn hundreds/thousands of dollars.

    In terms of getting the best exchange rate, that depends on how much it costs each person to purchase USD. The Rogers WE card charges you the MC rate, which is usually around 0.4%-0.6% above spot. For someone who purchases USD at less than that, then the Rogers card (or any Canadian card for that matter) would not get them the best exchange rate.
    efrant I think I just happened to encountered, the more researched guy in this subject? thanks!!!
     

    qbacreative

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Sep 2, 2019
    BMO has a US MC that might be of interest to you. The fee is waived if you spend a minimum of $1000 on it after the first year. We have this card and find we have never had a year that we didn't meet the target amount, its not hard to do.




    BMO® U.S. Dollar Mastercard®*
    • The Best BMO® Credit Card for Spending in U.S. dollars.
    • Low $35 USD annual fee
    • Fee Rebate offer: Spend just $1,000 USD in one year on your card, and the annual fee for the following year is on us
    • Free extended warranty and purchase protection
    • Zero Dollar Liability: protects you from unauthorized use of your credit card
    • 24-hour, out-of-country emergency assistance with GlobalAssistTM*
    • Acceptance at over 30 million locations in the U.S., Canada and worldwide
    • Cash advances at over 1 million ATMs worldwide5
    Thanks tinkerone!
     
  • qbacreative

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Sep 2, 2019
    I’m American but have lived in Canada for the past 14 years. Have you not needed a social security number to get a US credit card? I don’t ever remember getting one without giving them my social security number. Honestly, for what you want I see no benefit in getting a US credit card. It seems like a lot of hassle and moving money around. I still have my US bank account (still paying off my student loans) and my parents are still living there but for us the most simple and best solution has been to get Canadian credit cards with no foreign exchange fees. We have the Hometrust Visa and the Rogers world elite MasterCard, both of which have no annual fee. We put all of our spending on credit cards, we’re in the US all the time and I buy stuff from US websites all the time. Then you’re getting the best exchange rate you can get at the time of spending.
    Thanks StarSeven7!
     

    efrant

    Mouseketeer
    Joined
    Jan 4, 2017
    Thanks a lot efrant, so now I'm ready to go to one of the TD Orlando's branch next week, and open the account and the credit card.

    Btw last question, what are the benefits of the Disney Chase card?

    We are planning to go back to Disney again in after this trip 2021 or 2022, so by then I should have over a year of the U.S credit to open a Chase card.
    I don't have either of the Chase Disney cards, but here is a link (links to individual cards are on that page): https://www.chase.com/personal/credit-cards/disney
     

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