Your favorite dog breed and why...

Pea-n-Me

DIS Veteran
Joined
Jul 18, 2004
I've never heard of that before. Thankfully, Wheaten Terriers do not need to be hand-stripped.
While they don’t, it looks as if their grooming can also be somewhat complex depending on how it’s done:


Gorgeous dog, btw, and looks very sweet! :lovestruc My friend had one and she was also very sweet!

Grooming is going to have to be something I think very carefully about before getting our next dog! It might well be another Cairn but having two needing grooming might break the budget!
 

#1hoosierfan

DIS Veteran
Joined
Mar 27, 2010
I don’t think anybody has said a westie yet. They are headstrong, thinks the world revolves around them, self-important little turkeys, but I love them. I have two currently. Them we have lab mix and a hound mix. They are much more agreeable.
 
  • Pea-n-Me

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2004
    I don’t think anybody has said a westie yet. They are headstrong, thinks the world revolves around them, self-important little turkeys, but I love them. I have two currently. Them we have lab mix and a hound mix. They are much more agreeable.
    A cousin to the Cairn - I like them, too! (But the cut is different, lol.)
     

    bballmom56

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Feb 23, 2004
    We started with the big dogs - Irish Setter, Shepherd mix and a St. Bernard. All wonderful dogs, but the last two ended up with hind end problems which made it very difficult to help them as they were so heavy.

    We downsized to Corgis, a Bassador (bassett hound/lab mix - awesome!), and a mix of dachshund, papillion, and who knows what else. The Bassador also has hind end issues, but it is much easier to help her by picking her up to get her up and down stairs. We couldn't do that with the big ones and even a ramp didn't help them after awhile. We love having 3 of the smaller ones all at the same time. With the big ones we only had one at a time.
     

    luvavacation

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 23, 2006
    German Shepherd.

    I have had a GSD in my life since I was just over a year old. I will cross lanes of traffic just to pet one. A GSD that has been raised with love is always a winner.

    I love the personality of GSDs. They are loyal, intelligent, watchful, and training them is very easy, as long as you are the established Alpha. They are not a good choice for a family dog if you are not comfortable being the Alpha.

    Never did I have to worry about my safety when my GSD was by my side. Sweet, adorable, loving family member that will give it's life with no hesitation to protect it's family is something I value.

    I presently have a large, 120 pound plush coated male GSD, and a 2 year old female Golden Retriever.

    My Golden is the typical smiling, friendly, let me show you the jewelry as you pet me, Golden. She has never met a person she didn't like, she is intelligent, but, she is easily distracted by, well, anything, and thinks about whatever command she was just given to make sure it is what she actually wants to do (I tell her to come in, she will look around, think about the stick she is chewing, look for a squirrel, then finally decide that ok, she will come inside). I train almost every day (important with strong minded breeds), and while my Shepherd is focused on my every word and movement, the Golden is watching a butterfly, oh wait there is a leaf, hey look at the bee, oh mom has treats I want food ok I will sit! I prefer the blind obedience of my Shepherds. :blush:

    Unfortunately, as my husband and I get older and retirement is much closer, traveling with a GSD is not going to be easy due to breed restrictions at hotels and campgrounds. Even homeowner's insurance was surprisingly hard to find when we moved states. Hence, the Golden. Everyone loves a Golden, no one fears them, and I just may have to get used to crossing lanes of traffic to get in my Shepherd petting after our present boy leaves us. But at least having a dog, no matter the breed, is better than having no dog!
     
  • Pea-n-Me

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2004
    We started with the big dogs - Irish Setter, Shepherd mix and a St. Bernard. All wonderful dogs, but the last two ended up with hind end problems which made it very difficult to help them as they were so heavy.

    We downsized to Corgis, a Bassador (bassett hound/lab mix - awesome!), and a mix of dachshund, papillion, and who knows what else. The Bassador also has hind end issues, but it is much easier to help her by picking her up to get her up and down stairs. We couldn't do that with the big ones and even a ramp didn't help them after awhile. We love having 3 of the smaller ones all at the same time. With the big ones we only had one at a time.
    That is why we made the switch, too. After two on wheels I needed a break. Physically and emotionally it was a lot to care for a paralyzed dog, but mostly my heart was just broken.
    German Shepherd.

    I have had a GSD in my life since I was just over a year old. I will cross lanes of traffic just to pet one. A GSD that has been raised with love is always a winner.

    I love the personality of GSDs. They are loyal, intelligent, watchful, and training them is very easy, as long as you are the established Alpha. They are not a good choice for a family dog if you are not comfortable being the Alpha.

    Never did I have to worry about my safety when my GSD was by my side. Sweet, adorable, loving family member that will give it's life with no hesitation to protect it's family is something I value.

    I presently have a large, 120 pound plush coated male GSD, and a 2 year old female Golden Retriever.

    My Golden is the typical smiling, friendly, let me show you the jewelry as you pet me, Golden. She has never met a person she didn't like, she is intelligent, but, she is easily distracted by, well, anything, and thinks about whatever command she was just given to make sure it is what she actually wants to do (I tell her to come in, she will look around, think about the stick she is chewing, look for a squirrel, then finally decide that ok, she will come inside). I train almost every day (important with strong minded breeds), and while my Shepherd is focused on my every word and movement, the Golden is watching a butterfly, oh wait there is a leaf, hey look at the bee, oh mom has treats I want food ok I will sit! I prefer the blind obedience of my Shepherds. :blush:

    Unfortunately, as my husband and I get older and retirement is much closer, traveling with a GSD is not going to be easy due to breed restrictions at hotels and campgrounds. Even homeowner's insurance was surprisingly hard to find when we moved states. Hence, the Golden. Everyone loves a Golden, no one fears them, and I just may have to get used to crossing lanes of traffic to get in my Shepherd petting after our present boy leaves us. But at least having a dog, no matter the breed, is better than having no dog!
    And that’s partly why we’ve been on the fence about getting another, as well, although if the right one came along we’d have to see. We may foster. Although I like having a clean car and don’t miss the tumbleweeds, lol.
     

    Pea-n-Me

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2004
    We are considering an Schnoodle. Are schnauzers good with children and for 1st time dog owners?
    I don’t know much about schnauzers but I found this for you:


    Standard Schnauzer
    Standard schnauzers are friendly and intelligent dogs. They're highly social, love children and generally do best in a family. They are fiercely loyal and protective and have a long history as working dogs in Europe, capable of helping with various farm-related tasks. They also make good guard dogs thanks to their territorial nature and tendency to bark at strangers. Like many intelligent breeds, the schnauzer can be strong-willed, so training should begin as early as possible to combat any stubborn streaks. This breed also possesses a lot of energy and needs to be able to burn it off with plenty of exercise.

    Miniature Schnauzer
    Miniature schnauzers share many of the same personality traits with standard schnauzers, but there are a few key differences. Their small size, boisterous nature and tendency to bark at strangers and doorbells might make them seem yappy and high strung. Although they tend to do well with children, these dogs were bred to hunt small, furry creatures and should be supervised around small children. Similarly, they probably shouldn't co-exist in a house with pet rodents or birds and should be watched carefully around kittens. They do, however, tend to get along well with other dogs. While miniature schnauzers make good family pets, they have a tendency to single out a favorite person.

    Giant Schnauzer
    The giant schnauzer shares traits with both the standard and miniature schnauzers. Like the standard, the giant is intelligent, energetic and protective of family and children. However, like the miniature schnauzer, the giant should be supervised around babies and toddlers. These dogs were bred to work and are happiest when they have a task to focus on. They also require significant exercise, playtime and mental stimulation. Like all schnauzers, the giant is headstrong and should receive obedience training at a young age.


    If you are interested in a schnoodle there will be more to consider whereas it will be crossed with another breed, too - individual characteristics notwithstanding. I would say that, like with anything else, selecting a dog with a good background and training and socializing him right will go a long way toward keeping him friendly. Work with your children to help them understand the dog and treat him right, as well. No teasing or rough play; play games like fetch that don’t put the child against the dog, etc. Good luck!

     
  • Pea-n-Me

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2004
    We have a 16 yo Cairn. Great little dog but a brat - only listens when she wants. We think she is going deaf but can't tell because she never really listened.
    Haha, classic terrier from what I understand! Would love to see a picture of your Cairn! :goodvibes
     

    shelly3girls

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jun 25, 2002
    I would say a Golden if I could have a dog that sheds.

    We have a Coton du Tulear who is the sweetest most loving dog ever. She is truly a lap dog with a big heart and was so easy to train.

    We just added a Havanese to the family and she add a lot of life to the house. We just adore her.
     

    Faithsmom

    Earning My Ears
    Joined
    Jan 4, 2014
    My favorite dogs are a black lab and a golden retriever. I lost my lab Faith last August to cancer and am still heartbroken. I had a golden before Faith. His name was Sam. Both were absolutely wonderful dogs. The difference was Sam owned me and loved me while Faith loved me and worshiped me.
     

    Pea-n-Me

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Jul 18, 2004
    I have had all sorts of dogs since I was a baby, usually mutts. When my kids were little I had 2 Brittany Spaniels, mom and son. I loved them but they had health issues, mom got an aggressive cancer and the son started having seizures. We got a "small" dog next. I found my Nikki in a rescue and asked my son if she would get big, he assured me she wouldn't. He lied. She was a Boxer - Shepherd mix I found out later. She was 60+ pounds of pure heart. We all sobbed when we had to let her go to the Rainbow Bridge. I had a Corgi mix that was a great dog but she died young. When my Nikki died I vowed I would NEVER get another dog. Right!!!

    About a year after Nikki passed my SIL's cousin posted pics of some pups she was fostering. The owner surrendered the mother because the vet wouldn't abort the puppies and the mother was ruined. Pure bred Pug that one of her other dogs got to, she only wanted the dog to breed. The Pug mommy had the puppies that night. I knew I wanted one as soon as I saw the pups. I now have a Chug. She is a Chihuahua Pug mix and the sweetest dog. Very intelligent, easy to walk without a leash, we do leash her though. She is pad trained at my house and bell trained at my son's and she knows the difference. She honestly watches TV and can be anywhere in the house but she knows commercials and when one with a dog comes on she runs to the TV to bark at the dog. My grandson thinks her name is dumb - Chewbacca - Big name for a little dog but her personality lives up to it.

    I would post a picture but the files are all to large
    One thing you can do to post pics that are too large - email them to yourself but pick a smaller size as the attachment when you do, then you should be able to post them.
     

    Tinijocaro

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 5, 2005
    While they don’t, it looks as if their grooming can also be somewhat complex depending on how it’s done:


    Gorgeous dog, btw, and looks very sweet! :lovestruc My friend had one and she was also very sweet!

    Grooming is going to have to be something I think very carefully about before getting our next dog! It might well be another Cairn but having two needing grooming might break the budget!
    Same basic care as my bichons. I'm even doing nails on the bichon now I don't do the breed standard cut, as the guide shows.
    While they don’t, it looks as if their grooming can also be somewhat complex depending on how it’s done:


    Gorgeous dog, btw, and looks very sweet! :lovestruc My friend had one and she was also very sweet!

    Grooming is going to have to be something I think very carefully about before getting our next dog! It might well be another Cairn but having two needing grooming might break the budget!
    No fancy breed standard cuts for Murphy, just a simple Teddy Bear cut. Eventually, I'll groom him myself but for now, I'll let the pros break him in.:)
     

    stsomewhere

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Mar 13, 2008
    Aussies!!! Australian Shepards are our favorite. We currently have two. One 11 yr old and 1 year old. They are smart and very comical.
     

    firefly_ris

    DIS Veteran
    Joined
    Nov 25, 2015
    I like all dogs. Our last two were mixes, a 45lb hound/pit mix and an 85lb collie/St. Bernard mix. They have both since passed away and I really miss them. They were with us through me moving to NY, buying 3 houses, the births and young childhoods of all three of my children, and were like guardians to my kids, and I think moving forward it's hard to imagine feeling that way about another pet again. I've also fostered dogs of all shapes, sizes, ages, and sources. I grew up with 3 rough collies (Lassie dogs).

    Currently we have a 4 month old Havanese puppy. We had an incident with our last foster dog that I won't get into much but we took a long break and now for the family pet wanted something small to ease my kids back into. Bonus no shedding, but I've never had a dog that needed clipping/grooming before so that's all been new territory, and she got her very own #quarantinecut recently. I think we went a little short but on the other hand we have a lot of woods, water, etc. so it's a bit easier to keep her clean this way. So far she's been very social and sweet but is a huge, huge play mouther and ankle biter which is taking quite a while to get reigned in and has been a bit frustrating. It's extra hard with 3 active children in the house. The last puppies I had in the house were a set of lab puppy sisters and they weren't nearly so mouthy. I'm hoping once she loses her baby teeth some of the training will actually start sinking in. But she is otherwise very smart and has already learned sit, down, dance, outside?, stay, and working on paw. But at the moment I miss my elderly dogs who just slept all day!
     





    Connect

    Disney News and Updates





    SUBSCRIBE TO OUR DAILY EMAIL
    Subscribe and never miss out on Disney News, Deals and Updates.






    Top